If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site
We are OPEN and following CDC Guidelines

(517) 487-5171
Fax (517) 908-0172

Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

The plantar fascia is a long band of thick ligament on the bottom of the foot which connects the heel bone with the toes. Overuse during athletic activities or exercising/working on hard surfaces can damage the plantar fascia. Wearing ill-fitting shoes, gaining weight rapidly, or having flat feet or a tight Achilles tendon can also stress or tear the plantar fascia, causing it to become inflamed and painful. When this occurs, it is known as plantar fasciitis. People with plantar fasciitis usually experience pain on the bottom of the heel, however it can be felt anywhere in the heel. This pain may be dull or sharp, and it is at its worst first thing in the morning, after periods of rest or intense activity. Accompanying symptoms may include a tightness or stiffness in the heel or Achilles tendon, or a swollen heel. Since leaving the condition untreated may lead to chronic plantar fasciitis, professional care from a podiatrist is suggested for treatment.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Gary Cesar  from Michigan Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Lansing and Mt. Pleasant, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Friday, 10 September 2021 00:00

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

Swollen feet are a common ailment among pregnant women. As their belly grows so does the baby, and with this the feet tend to become bigger. This may be a result of thickened blood that develops during pregnancy, in addition to standing on the feet for most of the day. Research has indicated there are several different things that can be done to help alleviate foot pain during pregnancy. It is beneficial to elevate the feet as often as possible, as this may help to reduce existing swelling. Additionally, it can help to flex and point the feet at various times during the day to help improve circulation. Patients may see a noticeable difference in choosing shoes that are wide and have a low heel. Wearing cotton socks can help to avoid sweating and may improve comfort. If you would like more information about how to avoid foot pain during pregnancy, please consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Gary Cesar from Michigan Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Lansing and Mt. Pleasant, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women
Tuesday, 31 August 2021 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are wounds that can form on the feet of people with diabetes. Due to the combination of diabetic neuropathy and poor circulation that many people with diabetes experience, these wounds can often go undetected in their early stages and tend to heal slowly and poorly. The more severe the wound, and the longer it remains untreated, the more likely it is that there will be complications. Early detection and treatment of these wounds is crucial to the overall health of a person with diabetes. Daily visual inspections of your feet can be done at home as a preventive measure to check for any abnormalities or changes in the appearance of your feet. Take note of any cuts, scrapes, sores, discoloration, or strange sensations like pain, numbness, or tingling. If you notice anything unusual, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Gary Cesar from Michigan Foot and Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Lansing and Mt. Pleasant, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Connect with us